Histidine (Essential Amino Acid - Proteins) - Sources Include Soy Beans

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Histidine, also referred to as L-histamine, is an amino acid that is used in the biosynthesis of proteins. Histidine is an essential amino acid that is not synthesized de novo in humans. Humans and other animals must ingest histidine or histidine-containing proteins.

HISTIDINE

Histidine, also L-histamine, is an essential amino acid.

Histidine, also referred to as L-histamine, is an amino acid that is used in the biosynthesis of proteins. Histidine is an essential amino acid that is not synthesized de novo in humans. Humans and other animals must ingest histidine or histidine-containing proteins.

Children must obtain histidine through the foods they eat. Histidine is needed, especially during infancy, for proper growth and development. If children, especially infants, do not eat enough histidine containing foods, they may experience eczema, a form of dermatitis.

Histidine was initially thought essential only for infants, longer-term studies however, have shown it is essential for adults also. It is only produced in very small amounts by the body, it must predominantly be taken in through the diet. In certain cases, the synthesis of L-histidine is so limited that it is considered to be one of the essential amino acids.

 





L-histidine is involved in the synthesis of hemoglobin, tissue repair and the strengthening of the immune system.

Functions

Histidine is an amino acid that is used by the body to develop and maintain healthy tissues in all parts of the body, particularly the myelin sheaths that coat nerve cells and ensure the transmission of messages from the brain to various parts of the body. It may be useful for treatment of mental disorders as well as certain types of sexual dysfunction. It is also a precursor to histamine, a vital inflammatory agent in immune responses.

Histidine also protects the body from radiation damage, helps lower blood pressure, and aids in removing heavy metals from the system.

L-histidine is also involved in the synthesis of hemoglobin, tissue repair and the strengthening of the immune system.

Histidine can be converted to 3-methylhistidine, which serves as a biomarker for skeletal muscle damage, by certain methyltransferase enzymes.

Histidine is also a precursor for carnosine biosynthesis, which is a dipeptide found in skeletal muscle.

Histidine is considered a metalloprotein which could transport and combine a number of metals as well as iron and copper. It also enhances absorption of calcium, decreases the levels of histamine levels, and resulting in the control of diarrhea.

Since the loss of electrolytes and dehydration result to diarrhea, histidine can significantly improve performance by counteracting such effect. Histidine is also a significant mechanism in blood clotting aspect and can lessen internal bleeding.

In the gastrointestinal tract histamine causes intense stimulation of gastric hydrochloric acid secretion through H2 receptors.

Because histamine also stimulates the secretion of gastric juices, histidine may be helpful for people with indigestion resulting from a lack of stomach acid.





Diary is a good source of histidine.

Sources

Most foods contain at least some of the necessary amino acids. Protein-rich animal and fish foods like meat, poultry, all types of fish, dairy and eggs typically contain complete proteins, meaning that they supply the body with all essential amino acids. Plant-based foods on the other hand are incomplete and contain only some of the essential amino acids.

Soya beans (around 1097mg per 100g), chicken breast fillets (around 791mg per 100g) and beef (around 678mg per 100g) are particularly good sources of L-histidine and should be built in to the diet plan wherever possible.

Wheat germs (around 643mg per 100g) and raw salmon (around 549mg per 100g) are also suitable for meeting the daily requirement.

It is important to note that, like vitamins, the actual L-histidine content of these foods is dependent on the storage conditions and preparation methods, and may differ from the standard value. Above all peas, walnuts and maize should be kept sealed and out of sunlight, as UV radiation and oxygen gradually destroy the L-histidine contained, reducing the nutritional value of these foods.

A deficiency can lead to an increased tendency towards infection the aggravation of symptoms of allergies.

Deficiency

Low histidine levels are thought to lead to rheumatoid arthritis and deafness from nerve damage. Deficiency of histidine on infants causes eczema. As observed, deficiency of histidine is linked with duodenal and stomach ulcer. Histamine triggers the discharge of the digestive substance that stimulates the production of gastric juices called gastrin. Without sufficient production of histamine a good digestion may possibly be impaired.

Rheumatoid arthritis is recognized to be correlated with a relatively low histidine levels in the blood as well as increased 3-methylhistidine. According to a partial study, several people having rheumatoid arthritis have low histidine levels.

Furthermore, Histidine regulates the immune defense in the body, allergic reactions and inflammatory processes, so a deficiency of L-histidine can lead to an increased tendency towards infection and the aggravation of symptoms of allergies.

While there is no evidence of permanent damage from an overdose of histidine, levels too high for a person’s body weight can lead to stress, anxiety, and other mental disorders.

Considerations

While there is no evidence of permanent damage from an overdose of histidine, levels too high for a person’s body weight can lead to stress, anxiety, and other mental disorders.

Individuals with schizophrenia have been shown to have elevated levels of histidine, and such individuals, as well as those with bipolar disorder (also called manic depression) should not supplement with histidine without approval from their doctor.


Amounts.

Amounts

The Food and Nutrition Board (FNB) of the U.S. Institute of Medicine set Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) for essential amino acids in 2002. For histidine, for adults 19 years and older, 14 mg/kg body weight/day.

However, doses of up to 1 to 5g per day have been found to be safe, although using histidine supplements for months at a time may interfere with menstrual cycle in women of reproductive age, causing the cycle to come too early.





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