Stress | How It Occurs | Its Effects | How To Manage It |

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Everyone needs a little stress once in a while, in their life to perform. Think of a musical instrument; without enough tension, it goes seriously off tune, but too much stress or tension, and the string could snap. It’s the same thing with our bodies, the trick is to keep stress under control, and in balance. But what is stress anyway, how does it affect your body and your mind, and what can you do about it?

Stress, How It Occurs, Its Effects, And How To Manage It.

Everyone needs a little stress once in a while, in their life to perform. Think of a musical instrument; without enough tension, it goes seriously off tune, but too much stress or tension, and the string could snap. It’s the same thing with our bodies, the trick is to keep stress under control, and in balance. But what is stress anyway, how does it affect your body and your mind, and what can you do about it.

Stress is a type of psychological pain.

Defining stress

In psychology, stress is characterized as a feeling of strain and pressure, a type of psychological pain. Small amounts of stress may be desired, beneficial, and even healthy. Positive stress helps improve athletic performance. It also plays a factor in motivation, adaptation, and reaction to the environment. Excessive amounts of stress, however, may lead to bodily harm. Stress can increase the risk of strokes, heart attacks, ulcers, and mental illnesses such as depression. So how does stress occur?




Stress occurs as a reaction to "challenge".

How stress occurs

Stress starts off as a feeling, and a reaction to certain situations. It’s the body's way of making you more alert and ready to take on a challenge. When you encounter a perceived threat or are placed in a stressful situation, the hypothalamus, a tiny region at the base of your brain, sets off an alarm system in your body through a combination of nerve and hormonal signals.


This system prompts your adrenal glands, to release a surge of hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol. Adrenaline increases your heart rate, elevates your blood pressure, and boosts energy supplies. Cortisol, the primary stress hormone, increases glucose in the bloodstream. This natural reaction is called the stress response, and it can help us out a lot when we're in a critical situation, like when a driver or cyclist has to slam on the brakes.



When mild, it improves performance, when chronic, its detrimental to health.

How stress affects us

All of these stress reactions, enhance a person's ability to perform well under pressure. In a milder form and if managed, the stress response can help you concentrate better, and perform better for a recital, an athletic event, or even a test. The problem is that the body doesn't always reset itself to normal, and over the long term, if your mind and body are constantly on edge, you may face health problems.


The good news is that, you have a lot of control over stress, and it can get in tune with what stresses you out. You can make a plan to manage stress, and keep it working for you. How can you bust stress?

Ways to staying "calm" are the key to managing stress.

How to manage stress

Sleep is one of the things that you can use to counter stress. Sleep is the time when your brain and body recharge and thus a potent anti-stress. Listening to or playing music is a good stress reliever. Laughter produces a good relaxed feeling. Ask for help from a trusted adult or professional. Try out relaxation exercises like deep breathing individualization exercise and stay active.

Managing stress helps keep your mental state composed and health in check.

Benefits of managing stress

What's in it for you if you learn to master your stress and turn on your relaxation response? You will concentrate better, have less worry and anxiety. You might find tests are easier to take and you'll be in a better mood. And guess what, if you keep it up over a lifetime. You might even be healthier too. Too much stress can bring on illness or increase the severity of them, like diabetes and heart disease. Sounds good, doesn't it.



Meditation is a potent stress buster.

Summary

Every person is different, so you'll need to experiment to find out which stress relieving strategies work best for you. If you keep at it, you'll be in tune with your emotions and your stress. And that's like beautiful music for our bodies, our brains and our overall health.


That’s all we have to share for now in this article, please remember to leave a comment, share, and join the community. As a member you can host your own blog posts on the platform or just reach out, socialize, inspire and be inspired. As always, stay positive and keep looking up.





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